Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla (2002)

Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla (2002)

The Battle of the Century!

To protect Japan against another attack from Godzilla, the government creates a huge human-piloted robot, using a breakthrough technique of infusing DNA from the skeletal remains of the original Godzilla monster that attacked Japan in 1955 with high-tech machinery and electronics. Just as the robot is completed, Godzilla shows up once more. Is Mechagodzilla ready to fight or is it too early?

 

Godzilla – Mothra – King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack had proven to be Toho’s most ambitious project up until that point, even if the finale end product hadn’t lived up to expectations given the ‘star power’ of the monsters on show and the addition of Shusuke Kaneko in the director’s chair, who had given the Gamera series a ridiculously-good kick up the rear end to bring in kicking and screaming into the modern era. Hot on the heels of the success of GMK (for short), Toho wanted to keep the momentum going and so Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla came out a year later to add another sequel onto the Godzilla series. Not many franchises make it to number ten let alone twenty-six!

Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla is a marked improvement on its predecessor but still fails to really capture the magic that the late 90s Godzilla films had sparkled so well with. For me, the Heisei series (the name given to the Godzilla films from 1985-1995) marked a high note for the series which has never been bettered since in terms of scope, special effects, action and general entertainment. They even get the human side of the narrative working well, given that this element has always been on the back burner and used mainly for exposition to link monster fights together. Here, the script leaves plenty of holes and virtually reduces Godzilla to a supporting player: this is Kiryu’s film (the name given to Mechagodzilla).

Liberties are taken with Godzilla’s history again as the script cherry picks what it likes from not only Godzilla films but other Toho monster movies as well. It seems that Japan suffers from constant attacks from Godzilla and other monsters including Mothra (using footage from Mothra) and, rather oddly, Gaira (War of the Gargantuas). In the post-Godzilla 2000 era, either the writers have previously ignored all of the other films except for the original or included whichever previous films they needed in order to explain some plot or backstory. This constant re-working of the series does harm it – think back to the continuity during the previous series of films from 1984-1998 and you’ll see how it can help a series with recurring characters, plots uses from previous films, etc. It also means that the opening half of the film has to re-establish the threat of Godzilla as if he’s starting over from scratch – we know who Godzilla is, let him just start wrecking stuff by keeping continuity.

One of my pet hates with the 00s Godzilla films is their constant re-use of older monsters. I’m all up for seeing older versions of some of the classic monsters but why is it always the same ones being re-worked? Why do Mothra and Mechagodzilla always have to get brought back? I want to see some older monsters like Megalon or Titanosaurus brought back and given kick ass 21st century suits, not watching the same type of action sequences as I have done in previous instalments where Godzilla fights the same monsters and has the same type of battle. It’s quite annoying but because they’re popular monsters, they’re obviously going to get brought back more often. Mechagodzilla may have made a decent opponent for Godzilla back in the 70s – I mean both suits weren’t exactly top of the range and the manoeuvrability in them was limited to say the least. So because the special effects couldn’t really couldn’t do much back then, Mechagodzilla always seemed like an equal opponent for Godzilla.

However, with the advances in technology and particularly in the CGI stakes, Mechagodzilla now seems ridiculously over-powered to be taking on what is essentially a flesh-and-blood monster. The robot is more agile and has a better arsenal of weapons so surely Mechagodzilla should be winning fairly easily? Well thanks to the story, Mechagodzilla is basically just another whipping boy robot created by dumb humans and featuring human flaws and faults such as power failures. If scientists and technicians can build a massive DNA-structured cyborg, then surely they can come up with a smaller, easier way to destroy Godzilla like the oxygen destroyer weapon or something?

I don’t like the look of the new Mechagodzilla at all – obviously inspired by the Zoids toy series, it looks more like it belongs on an episode of Power Rangers. The Godzilla suit looks decent again but there are too many scenes in the film where he’s just standing still, as if it were an empty suit propped up against the wall with lights shone onto it. If you’re going to make the most agile Godzilla suit of the series, at least put it to some good use. Thankfully, they do get something right in this regard as the fight at the end of the film lasts for a long time and it’s one of the best in the Millenium series. Coupled with some great miniature sets and brighter lighting effects to make the fights more realistic, the whole thing looks very sharp indeed. The CGI sticks out like a sore thumb and makes the men-in-suits moments look distinctly ordinary.

 

Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla features some great monster action and some of the best special effects that the series has showcased up until this point, but the script needed more polish and focus to get the audience caring about what is happening. Despite all of the carnage, I don’t really care about either of the monsters fighting each other as they’re no real investment into either monster and everyone in Japan seems so laid back about Godzilla returning to destroy them.

 

 ★★★★★★☆☆☆☆ 

 

 

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