Land That Time Forgot, The (1974)

The Land That Time Forgot (1974)

Journey to a savage world where time is extinct!

During World War 1, the survivors of a torpedoed Allied merchant vessel seize control of the German submarine after it surfaces in a fog bank shortly afterwards. Hoping to sail to a British port, a German officer sabotages the radio and tampers with the compass, meaning that the submarine sails dramatically off course. With fuel running out and the temperatures getting colder, the crew inadvertently discover the mythical lost continent of Caprona in the South Atlantic, surrounded by icebergs but filled with lush vegetation and where dinosaurs still exist. Putting their differences aside to work together, the British and Germans explore the island whilst seeking to refine some of the crude oil in order to fuel their return to civilisation.

 

Amicus Productions, a long-standing rival studio to Hammer in the UK, enlisted the help of American International Pictures to co-finance this ambitious adaptation of Edgar Rice Burrough’s 1918 novel The Land That Time Forgot. I guess they saw that Hammer had diverted into prehistoric territory with a series of ‘lost world’ flicks such as One Million Years B.C. and When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth and fancied getting in on the act too as they were a big success. A modest box office hit at the time, The Land That Time Forgot spawned a further trio of lost continent-style adventures, all of which featured lantern-jawed American hero Doug McClure squaring off against a number of puppet dinosaurs on miniature sets.

One of my childhood favourites, The Land That Time Forgot used to be a staple diet of Saturday afternoons around school holidays. It has dated. A lot. I mean even back then, a couple of years before Star Wars hit the screens, it looks terribly cheap and out-dated. But it’s a lot of fun in an old school “they don’t make them like this anymore” kind of way. There’s just something so innocent about this type of film – no pretences about trying to make anything other than wanting the audience to have a good time whilst watching. The first half of the film works better than the second. The scenes involving the U-boat and the back-and-forth nature of who is in control between the British and the Germans make for some nice tension, and the initial trip into Caprona and unfortunate first encounter with a hungry dinosaur set things up nicely. Some great set design and even more impressive matte work really do turn Caprona into an exotic place. But it’s at this point that things don’t really kick in. It’s almost as if the writers don’t know what they can do with the story, so they just have the characters constantly going off in small groups to do some research or look for food and water where they are picked off one-by-one by dinosaurs or cavemen.

There are some of the least convincing dinosaurs ever put to film on show in The Land That Time Forgot but a certain rose-tinted hindsight leaves me unable to fully criticise them.  Literally all the majority of them do is stand there, roar and just allow the humans to pump them full of bullets. The rubbery material bends and flexes away as the dinosaurs move and fight with each other – a far cry from the quality stop-motion effects of Ray Harrhausen but a necessary route to take given how many monsters are on screen throughout the film. Thankfully, the miniature work is top notch and the finale involving the exploding volcano, a boiling lake and the submarine look fantastic, with lots of smoke and red and orange lights illuminating the little model. Derek Meddings was more noted for his work on Gerry Anderson’s puppet TV shows like Thunderbirds and Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons and it shows, with the miniatures looking nice and authentic. The production design across the board really do a good job of conveying the lost world of Caprona, despite the dinosaurs wobbling all over the place.

There’s a solid supporting cast of actors familiar to UK viewers, with the likes of Anthony Ainley (who would go on to play The Master in Doctor Who), John McEnery (known to school kids the world over as Mercutio from the Zefirrelli film version of Romeo and Juliet), Declan Mulholland (who would portray the human version of Jabba the Hutt in deleted scenes from Star Wars) and a bucket load of actors who went on to appear in Doctor Who or any number of British TV soaps and dramas. It’s McClure’s film though – the producers wanted an American star to sell to the US audience and McClure fitted the bill. Remember Troy McClure from The Simpsons? That washed-up B-movie actor was based upon the likes of McClure. He’s decent enough in this – punch first and ask questions later is his calling card. He takes everything in his stride and is calm and collected in the face of adversity. McClure knows that the material is a little bit hokey but he always gives it his all and tries to make everything else as believable as possible.

 

The Land That Time Forgot spawns a healthy dose of fun and nostalgia for anyone who remembers this from the 70s and 80s; modern viewers will find it less appealing. The special effects aren’t the best but given this was from an era even before Star Wars started pioneering work in the field, it’s an ambitious fantasy film made by a British studio not known for this type of genre who punched above their weight and made an enduring, if flawed, adventure.

 

 ★★★★★★★★★☆ 

 

 

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